Austin Reptile Service
Tim Cole
Phone: 512-83-SNAKE
(512-837-6253)
Email: timcole@austinreptileservice.net
Georgetown, Texas

Austin Area Lizards

TEXAS ALLIGATOR LIZARD, Gerrhonotus infernalis
This lizard is one of the largest lizards found in Texas. They average 15 - 20 inches. They live in the Edwards Plateau and the Big Bend regions. In Austin they are found in the several of the greenbelt areas. They feed on insects. They have a prehensile tail that allows them to anchor themselves or assist with climbing in foliage. They make good pets with the proper husbandry.

Texas Alligator Lizard
Adam Dawson
Texas Alligator Lizard
Adam Dawson

EASTERN COLLARED LIZARD, Crotaphystus collaris
The Eastern Collared Lizard is a fairly large species of lizard, capable of growing to about a foot in length, including tail. They have a big head and a distinct collar patter around their neck. They eat primarily insects, but sometimes will also eat smaller lizards. They are a basking species, and can often be found in rocky areas sunning themselves. They are fairly high strung, and will often flee rapidly if approached. Males are much more colorful than females.

Eastern Collared Lizard
Adam Dawson
Eastern Collared Lizard
Adam Dawson

MEDITERRANEAN GECKO, Hemidactylus turcicus
The Mediterranean Gecko is a species that was introduced to much of the southern United States from Europe. It is a small gecko, capable of growing to approximately 5 inches. They have toepads and small claws which allows them to climb almost any surface, such as a vertical brick face or even stick to glass. They are nocturnal and eat small insects. They have managed to find a niche in the Texas native ecosystem where they do not harm the native wildlife with their presence, unlike many other species which are introduced to foreign habitats.

Mediterranean Gecko
Adam Dawson
Mediterranean Gecko
Adam Dawson

TEXAS EARLESS LIZARD, Cophosaurus texanus texanus
Earless lizards are so named because they have no external ear openings. Presumably to protect their ears from getting dirt in them, when they are doing one of their favorite activities: digging. They are an insect eating species that prefers dry, sandy areas.

SPOT-TAILED EARLESS LIZARD, Holbrookia lacerata
Earless lizards are so named because they have no external ear openings. Presumably to protect their ears from getting dirt in them, when they are doing one of their favorite activities: digging. They are an insect eating species that prefers dry, sandy areas.

TEXAS HORNED LIZARD, Phrynosoma cornutum
Sometimes called a Horny Toad, or Horned Toad. The Texas Horned Lizard is a protected species in the state of Texas, and may not be harassed in any way, or kept in captivity without proper permits. They are a small lizad that grows from 4 to 6 inches. They feed almost exclusively on harvester ants, so do not make good pets at all. They are one of the largest species of horned lizard in the US.

TEXAS SPINY LIZARD, Sceloporus olivaceus
The Texas Spiny Lizard is one of the most common lizards in the Austin area. It is frequently found just about anywhere there are a few naturally growing trees. They are often mistaken for a horned lizard because of their spiny appearance, but unlike horned lizards, the Texas Spiny Lizard climbs trees exceptionally well. Like most lizards, they eat insects which makes them quite beneficial. Sometimes when a Texas Spiny Lizard is startled, it will leap from a tree and go running noisily through the leaf litter, but because of their camouflage coloring, they can still be difficult to spot.

Texas Spiny Lizard
Adam Dawson
Texas Spiny Lizard
Adam Dawson

SOUTHERN PRAIRIE LIZARD, Sceloporus undulatus consobrinus

TREE LIZARD, Urosaurus ornatus
The Tree Lizard is a species of arboreal lizard that is fairly rare in the Austin area, but can be found in greenbelt areas on occasion. They eat insects, and are typically found high in trees.

GREEN ANOLE, Anolis carolinensis
The Green Anole is one of the most common lizards in the Austin area. It can be found just about anywhere there is a good amount of vegetation, including suburban gardens. Despite their name, they have a limited ability to change color, so can sometimes be green, but can also be brown or even gray depending on the temperature out, and the amount of sunlight. Anoles are often seen basking on leaves or tree trunks. They eat insects.

Green Anole
Adam Dawson

SHORT LINED SKINK, Eumeces tetragrammus brevilineatus

GROUND SKINK, Scincella lateralis
The Ground Skink is a small species of lizard that is extremely common in the Austin area. They are ground dwellers, and are often found under rocks, logs or in leaf litter. They have very short legs, but they can move remarkably fast. They are primarily nocturnal and eat insects.

Ground Skink
Adam Dawson

TEXAS SPOTTED WHIPTAIL, Cnemidophorus gularis
The Texas Spotted Whiptail is a fast moving species of lizard. They can often be found in grassy, dry areas sunning themselves on rocks. They eat insects, and are extremely wary, often fleeing quickly as the first sign of a person approaching.

SIX LINED RACERUNNER, Cnemidophorus sexlineatus sexlineatus
The Six-lined Racerunner is closely related to the Spotted Whiptail. As their name implies, they are quite fast moving, and generally like areas of open grassland, or rocky areas where it can sun itself. They eat instects, and are quite wary, fleeing at the first sign of a person approaching.

Six Lined Racerunner
Steve Schwartzman

[ Home | About | Programs | Birthday Parties! | Pricing | Media | References | Links
Snake Myths | Why Snakes? | Austin Reptile ID Guides
Conditions of Use | Copyright 2001-2004 Austin Reptile Service