Austin Reptile Service
Tim Cole
Phone: 512-83-SNAKE
(512-837-6253)
Email: timcole@austinreptileservice.net
Georgetown, Texas

Snakes With Stripes

A stripe is defined as a line going from head to tail. Click on pictures to see a larger version.

non-venomousGARTER AND RIBBON SNAKES, Thamnophis species,
NON-VENOMOUS

Depending on the species the stripes can number from one to several, with the stripe color either red, yellow, or orange. These snakes are usually found near a permanent water source because their main diet consists of fish and frogs. They may be attracted to backyard fishponds if the fish are small enough to be prey.
Eastern Black-Neck Garter Snake

Eastern Black-Neck Garter Snake:
Males: 12-18 inches, females: up to 3-4 feet.
Bright orange stripe going down the back. Velvety-black patches on the neck. Juviniles: background color can be yellow and green, and still have black spots and bright orange stripe. Commonly found around permanent bodies of water because they feed on fish and frogs. Also known to feed on mice.

Checkered Garter Snake

Checkered Garter Snake:
Males: 12-18 inches, females: up to 3 feet.
Thin white or yellow stripe down the back, surrounded by checkerboard pattern of black spots. Not necessarily found by water because they feed readily on rodents, but will also eat fish and frogs.

Red Stripe Ribbon Snake

Red Stripe Ribbon Snake:
Males: 12-18 inches, females: up to 3-4 feet.
Dark red strip down back. Thinner snake than garter snakes. Commonly found around permanent bodies of water because they feed on fish and frogs.

 

non-venomousTEXAS PATCHNOSE SNAKE, Salvadora grahamiae lineata
NON-VENOMOUS
Adults average 3 feet in length.
A long and slender snake with yellow and black stripes. They eat lizards, snakes and occasionally rodents. They are diurnal (active in the daytime).
Texas Patchnose Snake
photo by Adam Dawson
Texas Patchnose Snake
photo by Adam Dawson
Texas Patchnose Snake
photo by Adam Dawson

 

non-venomousTEXAS BROWN SNAKE, Storeria dekayi texana
NON-VENOMOUS
Adults average 12 inches in length.

Adults and young are reddish brown colored bodies with dark brown spots around the eyes. Some have a faint light stripe down the back. hey feed primarily on slugs and earthworms. They can be found in moist flowerbeds, gardens, and moist woodlands.

Texas Brown Snake
photo by Adam Dawson
Texas Brown Snake
photo by Adam Dawson
Texas Brown Snake
photo by Adam Dawson

non-venomousTEXAS LINED SNAKE, Tropidoclonion lineatum texanum
NON-VENOMOUS
The adult averages only about one foot in length.
It has a pale stripe on a very dark background with a faint row of spots on either side of the stripe. A very common snake found even in vacant city lots and backyards. Usually found hiding under rocks, logs and landscape materials. They feed on earthworms and sow bugs.
Texas Lined Snake
photo by Adam Dawson
Texas Lined Snake
photo by Adam Dawson
Texas Lined Snake
photo by Adam Dawson

 

venomousCANEBRAKE RATTLESNAKE, Crotalus horridus
(Venomous)

These snakes average 3 to 4 feet in length.
Canebrake Rattlesnakes also refered to as the Timber Rattlesnake are generally found in the Central and Eastern piney woods area of Texas. This is a threatened species protected in Texas. A few have been found in Bastrop County but are extremly rare.
The snakes background color is usually a shade of gray, tan or brown. On the snakes back are dark chevrons or V-shaped bands. An orange stripe of varying shades and width runs from head to tail sometimes fading in the last third portion of the snake. The tail is black or dark brown. They are a mild mannered snake with potent venom.
Canebrake Rattlesnake
photo by Adam Dawson
Canebrake Rattlesnake
photo by Adam Dawson
Canebrake Rattlesnake
photo by Adam Dawson
Canebrake Rattlesnake
photo by Adam Dawson

Austin Reptile ID Guides | Snakes with stripes | Snakes with blotches
Snakes with diamonds | Snakes with bands | Solid colored snakes

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