Meet the... Snakes Lizards Turtles/Tortoises of Austin Reptile Service!

Meet the... Snakes Lizards Turtles/Tortoises of Austin Reptile Service!

Meet Our
Snakes!

All Austin Reptile Service snakes
are non-venomous!

You may choose which snakes you want for your party/event on the Book a Party/Event Form.

Arizona Mountain Kingsnake
Arizona Mountain Kingsnake
A constrictor growing to lengths of six feet or more. Special belly scales enable it to climb trees and raid bird nests for eggs and hatchlings as well.
Wiki Info
Arizona Mountain KingsnakeNon-venomous. Eats rodents, birds, eggs, lizards, frogs, and insects.
Bullsnake
Bullsnake
This non-venomous snake is the second-longest snake in Texas behind the indigo snake.
More Info
BullsnakeNon-venomous constrictor. Texas native.
Corn Snake
Corn Snake
Corn snakes lack functional venom and are harmless and beneficial to humans by helping to control populations of wild rodent pests that damage crops and spread disease. Their docile nature, reluctance to bite, moderate adult size, attractive pattern, and comparatively simple care make them commonly kept pet snakes.
Wiki Info
Corn SnakeNon-venomous constrictor. Very calm and easy to handle.
Corn Snake (Snow)
Corn Snake (Snow)
Snow Corn Snakes are also called amelanistic corn snakes because they lack melanin.

The eyes are red, orange or pink against the pale pinkish-white skin.
Wiki Info
Corn Snake (Snow)Non-venomous constrictor. This snake lacks melanin and has pale pinkish-white skin.
Hognose (Eastern)
Hognose (Eastern)
The Eastern Hognose's color and pattern is highly variable between subspecies. It possesses a sharply upturned snout that is used for digging and burrowing.
More Info
Hognose (Eastern)A relatively small, stout-bodied snake. Texas native.
Hognose (Western, Albino)
Hognose (Western, Albino)
Albinism is the "congenital absence of any pigmentation or coloration in a person, animal or plant, resulting in white hair, feathers, scales and skin and pink eyes..."
Wiki Info
Hognose (Western, Albino)A relatively small, stout-bodied snake. Texas native.
Rosy Boa (locale 1)
Rosy Boa (local 1)
A small snake, the Rosy Boa normally attains a total length (including tail) of 17–34 in (43–86 cm), although some coastal specimens from California reach 36–44 in (91–112 cm).
Wiki Info
Rosy Boa (locale 1)Non-venomous, the rosy boa is one of only two species in the boa family native to the United States, the other being the rubber boa.
Texas Rat Snake
Texas Rat Snake
The Texas Rat Snake is one of the most commonly encountered species of non-venomous snake in Central Texas. They are non-venomous and pose no threat to humans.
More Info
Texas Rat SnakeNon-venomous constrictor. Very calm and easy to handle. Texas native.
Ball Python
Ball python
Black or dark brown with light brown blotches on the back and sides. Its white or cream belly is scattered with black markings. It is a stocky snake with a relatively small head and smooth scales
Wiki Info
Ball PythonNon-venomous species native to West and Central Africa.
Coachwhip (Western)
Coachwhip (Western)
Coachwhips are thin-bodied snakes with small heads and large eyes with round pupils. They vary greatly in color, but most reflect a proper camouflage for their natural habitat.
More Info
Coachwhip (Western)Non-venomous, sometimes referred to as the "whip snake". Texas native.
Corn Snake (Albino)
Corn Snake (Albino)
These snakes have striking, ruby-red eyes. Their body coloring is a pattern of dark red blotches on a deep orange background with a white belly. They have no black pigment. They make great pet snakes for the beginner.
Wiki Info
Corn Snake (Albino)Non-venomous constrictor. Very calm and easy to handle. Texas native.
Corn Snake (Creamsicle)
Corn Snake (Creamsicle)
A crossbreed of a Rat Snake and a Corn Snake with no black pigment.
Wiki Info
Corn Snake (Creamsicle)Non-venomous constrictor. Very calm and easy to handle.
Grey Banded Kingsnake (Blair phase)
Grey Banded Kingsnake
This non-venomous snake's natural range is sparsely populated with humans, and many regions are virtually impassable due to the mountainous terrain.
Wiki Info
Grey Banded Kingsnake (Blair phase)Non-venomous, nocturnal and quite secretive. Texas native.
Hognose (Western)
Hognose (Western)
The Western Hognose's color and pattern is highly variable between subspecies. It possesses a sharply upturned snout that is used for digging and burrowing.
Wiki Info
Hognose (Western)A relatively small, stout-bodied snake. Texas native.
Mexican Milk Snake
Mexican Milk Snake
This snake is native to the hot semi-arid regions of northeastern Mexico in Coahuila, Tamaulipas and Nuevo León, but it can be found as far north as the United States, in southwestern Texas.
Wiki Info
Mexican Milk SnakeNon-venomous. Red, black & cream or yellow banding; a coral snake mimic. Texas native.
Yellow Rat Snake
Yellow Rat Snake
A constrictor growing to lengths of six feet or more. Special belly scales enable it to climb trees and raid bird nests for eggs and hatchlings as well.
Wiki Info
Yellow Rat SnakeNon-venomous. Eats rodents, birds, eggs, lizards, frogs, and insects. Texas native.

Meet Our
Snakes!

All Austin Reptile Service snakes
are non-venomous!

You may choose which snakes you want for your party/event on the Book a Party/Event Form.

Arizona Mountain Kingsnake
Arizona Mountain Kingsnake
A constrictor growing to lengths of six feet or more. Special belly scales enable it to climb trees and raid bird nests for eggs and hatchlings as well.
Wiki Info
Arizona Mountain KingsnakeNon-venomous. Eats rodents, birds, eggs, lizards, frogs, and insects.

(click photo for animal info)

Bullsnake
Bullsnake
This non-venomous snake is the second-longest snake in Texas behind the indigo snake.
More Info
BullsnakeNon-venomous constrictor. Texas native.

(click photo for animal info)

Corn Snake
Corn Snake
Corn snakes lack functional venom and are harmless and beneficial to humans by helping to control populations of wild rodent pests that damage crops and spread disease. Their docile nature, reluctance to bite, moderate adult size, attractive pattern, and comparatively simple care make them commonly kept pet snakes.
Wiki Info
Corn SnakeNon-venomous constrictor. Very calm and easy to handle.

(click photo for animal info)

Corn Snake (Snow)
Corn Snake (Snow)
Snow Corn Snakes are also called amelanistic corn snakes because they lack melanin.

The eyes are red, orange or pink against the pale pinkish-white skin.
Wiki Info
Corn Snake (Snow)Non-venomous constrictor. This snake lacks melanin and has pale pinkish-white skin.

(click photo for animal info)

Hognose (Eastern)
Hognose (Eastern)
The Eastern Hognose's color and pattern is highly variable between subspecies. It possesses a sharply upturned snout that is used for digging and burrowing.
More Info
Hognose (Eastern)A relatively small, stout-bodied snake. Texas native.

(click photo for animal info)

Hognose (Western, Albino)
Hognose (Western, Albino)
Albinism is the "congenital absence of any pigmentation or coloration in a person, animal or plant, resulting in white hair, feathers, scales and skin and pink eyes..."
Wiki Info
Hognose (Western, Albino)A relatively small, stout-bodied snake. Texas native.

(click photo for animal info)

Rosy Boa (locale 1)
Rosy Boa (local 1)
A small snake, the Rosy Boa normally attains a total length (including tail) of 17–34 in (43–86 cm), although some coastal specimens from California reach 36–44 in (91–112 cm).
Wiki Info
Rosy Boa (locale 1)Non-venomous, the rosy boa is one of only two species in the boa family native to the United States, the other being the rubber boa.

(click photo for animal info)

Texas Rat Snake
Texas Rat Snake
The Texas Rat Snake is one of the most commonly encountered species of non-venomous snake in Central Texas. They are non-venomous and pose no threat to humans.
More Info
Texas Rat SnakeNon-venomous constrictor. Very calm and easy to handle. Texas native.

(click photo for animal info)

Ball Python
Ball python
Black or dark brown with light brown blotches on the back and sides. Its white or cream belly is scattered with black markings. It is a stocky snake with a relatively small head and smooth scales
Wiki Info
Ball PythonNon-venomous species native to West and Central Africa.

(click photo for animal info)

Coachwhip (Western)
Coachwhip (Western)
Coachwhips are thin-bodied snakes with small heads and large eyes with round pupils. They vary greatly in color, but most reflect a proper camouflage for their natural habitat.
More Info
Coachwhip (Western)Non-venomous, sometimes referred to as the "whip snake". Texas native.

(click photo for animal info)

Corn Snake (Albino)
Corn Snake (Albino)
These snakes have striking, ruby-red eyes. Their body coloring is a pattern of dark red blotches on a deep orange background with a white belly. They have no black pigment. They make great pet snakes for the beginner.
Wiki Info
Corn Snake (Albino)Non-venomous constrictor. Very calm and easy to handle. Texas native.

(click photo for animal info)

Corn Snake (Creamsicle)
Corn Snake (Creamsicle)
A crossbreed of a Rat Snake and a Corn Snake with no black pigment.
Wiki Info
Corn Snake (Creamsicle)Non-venomous constrictor. Very calm and easy to handle.

(click photo for animal info)

Grey Banded Kingsnake (Blair phase)
Grey Banded Kingsnake
This non-venomous snake's natural range is sparsely populated with humans, and many regions are virtually impassable due to the mountainous terrain.
Wiki Info
Grey Banded Kingsnake (Blair phase)Non-venomous, nocturnal and quite secretive. Texas native.

(click photo for animal info)

Hognose (Western)
Hognose (Western)
The Western Hognose's color and pattern is highly variable between subspecies. It possesses a sharply upturned snout that is used for digging and burrowing.
Wiki Info
Hognose (Western)A relatively small, stout-bodied snake. Texas native.

(click photo for animal info)

Mexican Milk Snake
Mexican Milk Snake
This snake is native to the hot semi-arid regions of northeastern Mexico in Coahuila, Tamaulipas and Nuevo León, but it can be found as far north as the United States, in southwestern Texas.
Wiki Info
Mexican Milk SnakeNon-venomous. Red, black & cream or yellow banding; a coral snake mimic. Texas native.

(click photo for animal info)

Yellow Rat Snake
Yellow Rat Snake
A constrictor growing to lengths of six feet or more. Special belly scales enable it to climb trees and raid bird nests for eggs and hatchlings as well.
Wiki Info
Yellow Rat SnakeNon-venomous. Eats rodents, birds, eggs, lizards, frogs, and insects. Texas native.

(click photo for animal info)

Meet Our
Snakes!

Meet Our
Snakes!

All Austin Reptile Service snakes
are non-venomous!

You may choose which snakes you want for your party/event on the Book a Party/Event Form.

Arizona Mountain Kingsnake
Arizona Mountain Kingsnake
A constrictor growing to lengths of six feet or more. Special belly scales enable it to climb trees and raid bird nests for eggs and hatchlings as well.
Wiki Info
Arizona Mountain KingsnakeNon-venomous. Eats rodents, birds, eggs, lizards, frogs, and insects.

(click photo for animal info)

Ball Python
Ball python
Black or dark brown with light brown blotches on the back and sides. Its white or cream belly is scattered with black markings. It is a stocky snake with a relatively small head and smooth scales
Wiki Info
Ball PythonNon-venomous species native to West and Central Africa.

(click photo for animal info)

Bullsnake
Bullsnake
This non-venomous snake is the second-longest snake in Texas behind the indigo snake.
More Info
BullsnakeNon-venomous constrictor. Texas native.

(click photo for animal info)

Coachwhip (Western)
Coachwhip (Western)
Coachwhips are thin-bodied snakes with small heads and large eyes with round pupils. They vary greatly in color, but most reflect a proper camouflage for their natural habitat.
More Info
Coachwhip (Western)Non-venomous, sometimes referred to as the "whip snake". Texas native.

(click photo for animal info)

Corn Snake
Corn Snake
Corn snakes lack functional venom and are harmless and beneficial to humans by helping to control populations of wild rodent pests that damage crops and spread disease. Their docile nature, reluctance to bite, moderate adult size, attractive pattern, and comparatively simple care make them commonly kept pet snakes.
Wiki Info
Corn SnakeNon-venomous constrictor. Very calm and easy to handle.

(click photo for animal info)

Corn Snake (Albino)
Corn Snake (Albino)
These snakes have striking, ruby-red eyes. Their body coloring is a pattern of dark red blotches on a deep orange background with a white belly. They have no black pigment. They make great pet snakes for the beginner.
Wiki Info
Corn Snake (Albino)Non-venomous constrictor. Very calm and easy to handle. Texas native.

(click photo for animal info)

Corn Snake (Creamsicle)
Corn Snake (Creamsicle)
A crossbreed of a Rat Snake and a Corn Snake with no black pigment.
Wiki Info
Corn Snake (Creamsicle)Non-venomous constrictor. Very calm and easy to handle.

(click photo for animal info)

Corn Snake (Snow)
Corn Snake (Snow)
Snow Corn Snakes are also called amelanistic corn snakes because they lack melanin.

The eyes are red, orange or pink against the pale pinkish-white skin.
Wiki Info
Corn Snake (Snow)Non-venomous constrictor. This snake lacks melanin and has pale pinkish-white skin.

(click photo for animal info)

Grey Banded Kingsnake (Blair phase)
Grey Banded Kingsnake
This non-venomous snake's natural range is sparsely populated with humans, and many regions are virtually impassable due to the mountainous terrain.
Wiki Info
Grey Banded Kingsnake (Blair phase)Non-venomous, nocturnal and quite secretive. Texas native.

(click photo for animal info)

Hognose (Eastern)
Hognose (Eastern)
The Eastern Hognose's color and pattern is highly variable between subspecies. It possesses a sharply upturned snout that is used for digging and burrowing.
More Info
Hognose (Eastern)A relatively small, stout-bodied snake. Texas native.

(click photo for animal info)

Hognose (Western, Albino)
Hognose (Western, Albino)
Albinism is the "congenital absence of any pigmentation or coloration in a person, animal or plant, resulting in white hair, feathers, scales and skin and pink eyes..."
Wiki Info
Hognose (Western, Albino)A relatively small, stout-bodied snake. Texas native.

(click photo for animal info)

Rosy Boa (locale 1)
Rosy Boa (local 1)
A small snake, the Rosy Boa normally attains a total length (including tail) of 17–34 in (43–86 cm), although some coastal specimens from California reach 36–44 in (91–112 cm).
Wiki Info
Rosy Boa (locale 1)Non-venomous, the rosy boa is one of only two species in the boa family native to the United States, the other being the rubber boa.

(click photo for animal info)

Hognose (Western)
Hognose (Western)
The Western Hognose's color and pattern is highly variable between subspecies. It possesses a sharply upturned snout that is used for digging and burrowing.
Wiki Info
Hognose (Western)A relatively small, stout-bodied snake. Texas native.

(click photo for animal info)

Mexican Milk Snake
Mexican Milk Snake
This snake is native to the hot semi-arid regions of northeastern Mexico in Coahuila, Tamaulipas and Nuevo León, but it can be found as far north as the United States, in southwestern Texas.
Wiki Info
Mexican Milk SnakeNon-venomous. Red, black & cream or yellow banding; a coral snake mimic. Texas native.

(click photo for animal info)

Texas Rat Snake
Texas Rat Snake
The Texas Rat Snake is one of the most commonly encountered species of non-venomous snake in Central Texas. They are non-venomous and pose no threat to humans.
More Info
Texas Rat SnakeNon-venomous constrictor. Very calm and easy to handle. Texas native.

(click photo for animal info)

Yellow Rat Snake
Yellow Rat Snake
A constrictor growing to lengths of six feet or more. Special belly scales enable it to climb trees and raid bird nests for eggs and hatchlings as well.
Wiki Info
Yellow Rat SnakeNon-venomous. Eats rodents, birds, eggs, lizards, frogs, and insects. Texas native.

(click photo for animal info)

Meet Our
Lizards!

Meet Our
Lizards!

All Austin Reptile Service lizards
are non-venomous!

You may choose which lizards you want for your party/event on the Book a Party/Event Form.

Bearded Dragon
Bearded Dragon
The name "bearded dragon" refers to the "beard" of the dragon, the underside of the throat, which can turn black for a number of reasons, most often as a result of stress.
Wiki Info
Bearded DragonNon-venomous lizard. Several species of this genus are often kept as pets.

(click photo for animal info)

Uromastyx (Egyptian)
Uromastyx (Egyptian)
These lizards can be found in Egypt, Libya, Palestine, Israel, and throughout the Middle East but is rarely found today due to the reduction of habitat.
Wiki Info
Uromastyx (Egyptian)Non-venomous. Egyptian Uromastyx is one of the largest members of their category, with average lengths of 30" for males.

Photo by Eitan F.

Uromastyx (Mali)
Uromastyx (Mali)
These lizards' colors change according to the temperature: during cool weather, they appear dull and dark but the colors become lighter in warm weather.
Wiki Info
Uromastyx (Mali)Non-venomous. Uromastyx inhabits most of North and Northeast Africa and the Middle East.

(click photo for animal info)

Meet Our
Lizards!

All Austin Reptile Service lizards
are non-venomous!

You may choose which lizards you want for your party/event on the Book a Party/Event Form.

Bearded Dragon
Bearded Dragon
The name "bearded dragon" refers to the "beard" of the dragon, the underside of the throat, which can turn black for a number of reasons, most often as a result of stress.
Wiki Info
Bearded DragonNon-venomous lizard. Several species of this genus are often kept as pets.

(click photo for animal info)

Uromastyx (Egyptian)
Uromastyx (Egyptian)
These lizards can be found in Egypt, Libya, Palestine, Israel, and throughout the Middle East but is rarely found today due to the reduction of habitat.
Wiki Info
Uromastyx (Egyptian)Non-venomous. Egyptian Uromastyx is one of the largest members of their category, with average lengths of 30" for males.

Photo by Eitan F.

(click photo for animal info)

Uromastyx (Mali)
Uromastyx (Mali)
These lizards' colors change according to the temperature: during cool weather, they appear dull and dark but the colors become lighter in warm weather.
Wiki Info
Uromastyx (Mali)Non-venomous. Uromastyx inhabits most of North and Northeast Africa and the Middle East.

(click photo for animal info)

Meet Our
Lizards!

Meet Our
Lizards!

All Austin Reptile Service lizards
are non-venomous!

You may choose which lizards you want for your party/event on the Book a Party/Event Form.

Bearded Dragon
Bearded Dragon
The name "bearded dragon" refers to the "beard" of the dragon, the underside of the throat, which can turn black for a number of reasons, most often as a result of stress.
Wiki Info
Bearded DragonNon-venomous lizard. Several species of this genus are often kept as pets.

(click photo for animal info)

Uromastyx (Egyptian)
Uromastyx (Egyptian)
These lizards can be found in Egypt, Libya, Palestine, Israel, and throughout the Middle East but is rarely found today due to the reduction of habitat.
Wiki Info
Uromastyx (Egyptian)Non-venomous. Egyptian Uromastyx is one of the largest members of their category, with average lengths of 30" for males. Ph

Photo by Eitan F.

(click photo for animal info)

Uromastyx (Mali)
Uromastyx (Mali)
These lizards' colors change according to the temperature: during cool weather, they appear dull and dark but the colors become lighter in warm weather.
Wiki Info
Uromastyx (Mali)Non-venomous. Uromastyx inhabits most of North and Northeast Africa and the Middle East.

(click photo for animal info)

Meet Our
Turtles/Tortoises!

You may choose which Turtles/Tortoises you want for your party/event on the Book a Party/Event Form.

Alligator Snapping Turtle
Alligator Snapping Turtle
The alligator snapping turtle is given its common name because of its immensely powerful jaws and distinct ridges on its shell that are similar in appearance to the rough, ridged skin of an alligator.
Wiki Info
Alligator Snapping TurtleThis turtle is found primarily in southeastern United States waters and is one of the heaviest freshwater turtles in the world.

(click photo for animal info)

Common Musk Turtle (Stinkpot)
Common Musk Turtle (Stinkpot)
The common musk turtle is almost entirely aquatic, spending the vast majority of its time in shallow, heavily vegetated waters of slow-moving creeks or in ponds.
More Info
Common Musk Turtle (Stinkpot)This is a species of small turtle and is native to southeastern Canada and much of the Eastern United States.

(click photo for animal info)

Desert Box Turtle
Desert Box Turtle
Lives in desert grasslands/shrublands and may face a drier, more severe environment compared with other box turtles in North America.
Wiki Info
Desert Box TurtleEndemic to the southwestern United States and northern Mexico.

(click photo for animal info)

Hermann's Tortoise
Hermann's Tortoise
Several tortoise sanctuaries are located in Europe, such as Carapax in southern Tuscany, and Le Village Des Tortues in the south of France (near Gonfaron).
Wiki Info
Hermann's TortoiseHermann's Tortoise can be found throughout southern Europe.

Photo by Orchi

(click photo for animal info)

Painted Wood Turtle
Painted Wood Turtle
Painted Wood Turtles can be kept as pets, and it has long been imported into the various parts of Asia, such as Japan, Taiwan and China.
Wiki Info
Painted Wood TurtleFound in Mexico (from Sonora southwards) and Central America, as far south as Costa Rica.

(click photo for animal info)

Razor-backed Musk Turtle
Razor-backed Musk Turtle
This turtle is almost entirely aquatic, spending most of its time in shallow, heavily vegetated, slow-moving creeks, ponds, streams, and swamps.
Wiki Info
Razor-backed Musk TurtleThis species is native to the southern U.S. and is found in AL, AR, LA, MS, OK, TX and FL.

(click photo for animal info)

Russian Tortoise
Russian Tortoise
In September 1968 two Russian tortoises flew to the Moon, circled it, and returned safely to Earth on the Russian Zond 5 mission.
Wiki Info
Russian TortoiseThe Russian Tortoise is a threatened species and is endemic to Central Asia.

Photo by Yuriy Danilevsky

(click photo for animal info)

Bell's Hinge-back Tortoise
Bell's Hinge-back Tortoise
Bell's hinge-back tortoise is an omnivore, with a very varied diet consisting mainly of a range of different plants, but also including insects and other meat.
Wiki Info
Bell's Hinge-back TortoiseBell's Hinge-back Tortoise is a species of African tortoise,

(click photo for animal info)

Common Snapping Turtle
Common Snapping Turtle
Common snapping turtles sometimes bask—though rarely observed—by floating on the surface with only the upper section of their shell exposed.
More Info
Common Snapping TurtleIts natural range extends from southeastern Canada, southwest to the edge of the Rocky Mountains, as far east as Nova Scotia and Florida.

(click photo for animal info)

Eastern Box Turtle
Eastern Box Turtle
Box turtles are slow crawlers, extremely long lived, slow to mature, and have relatively few offspring per year.
Wiki Info
Eastern Box TurtleThey occur in southern Maine & the southern/eastern portions of the Michigan Upper Peninsula, southern FL & eastern KS, OK, & TX.

(click photo for animal info)

Ornate Box Turtle
Ornate Box Turtle
This turtle is an omnivore, eating grasses, berries, insects and other invertebrates (caterpillars, grasshoppers, beetles, earthworms), fruits, vegetables, and carrion.
Wiki Info
Ornate Box TurtleThis species is one of only two terrestrial species of turtles native to the Great Plains of the United States.

(click photo for animal info)

Pancake Tortoise
Pancake Tortoise
The Pancake Tortoise has an unusually thin, flat, flexible shell, which is up to 7" long.
Wiki Info
Pancake TortoiseThe species is native to Tanzania and Kenya. Its common name refers to the flat shape of its shell.

Photo by Dave Pape

(click photo for animal info)

Redfoot Tortoise (baby)
Redfoot Tortoise
They are omnivorous with a diet based on an assortment of plants, fruit when available, but also including grasses, flowers, fungi, carrion, and invertebrates.
Wiki Info
Redfoot Tortoise (baby)The red-footed tortoise is a species from northern South America.

Photo by Erlend Bjørtvedt (CC-BY-SA)

(click photo for animal info)

Three-Toed Box Turtle
Three-Toed Box Turtle
Three-toed box turtles are named due to the number of toes on the back feet but some think that there are some 4-toed examples too.
More Info
Three-Toed Box TurtleThis species is native to the south-central part of the United States and is the official reptile of the state of Missouri.

(click photo for animal info)

Meet Our
Turtles/Tortoises!

You may choose which Turtles/Tortoises you want for your party/event on the Book a Party/Event Form.

Alligator Snapping Turtle
Alligator Snapping Turtle
The alligator snapping turtle is given its common name because of its immensely powerful jaws and distinct ridges on its shell that are similar in appearance to the rough, ridged skin of an alligator.
Wiki Info
Alligator Snapping TurtleThis turtle is found primarily in southeastern United States waters and is one of the heaviest freshwater turtles in the world.

(click photo for animal info)

Common Musk Turtle (Stinkpot)
Common Musk Turtle (Stinkpot)
The common musk turtle is almost entirely aquatic, spending the vast majority of its time in shallow, heavily vegetated waters of slow-moving creeks or in ponds.
More Info
Common Musk Turtle (Stinkpot)This is a species of small turtle and is native to southeastern Canada and much of the Eastern United States.

(click photo for animal info)

Desert Box Turtle
Desert Box Turtle
Lives in desert grasslands/shrublands and may face a drier, more severe environment compared with other box turtles in North America.
Wiki Info
Desert Box TurtleEndemic to the southwestern United States and northern Mexico.

(click photo for animal info)

Hermann's Tortoise
Hermann's Tortoise
Several tortoise sanctuaries are located in Europe, such as Carapax in southern Tuscany, and Le Village Des Tortues in the south of France (near Gonfaron).
Wiki Info
Hermann's TortoiseHermann's Tortoise can be found throughout southern Europe.

Photo by Orchi

(click photo for animal info)

Painted Wood Turtle
Painted Wood Turtle
Painted Wood Turtles can be kept as pets, and it has long been imported into the various parts of Asia, such as Japan, Taiwan and China.
Wiki Info
Painted Wood TurtleFound in Mexico (from Sonora southwards) and Central America, as far south as Costa Rica.

(click photo for animal info)

Razor-backed Musk Turtle
Razor-backed Musk Turtle
This turtle is almost entirely aquatic, spending most of its time in shallow, heavily vegetated, slow-moving creeks, ponds, streams, and swamps.
Wiki Info
Razor-backed Musk TurtleThis species is native to the southern U.S. and is found in AL, AR, LA, MS, OK, TX and FL.

(click photo for animal info)

Russian Tortoise
Russian Tortoise
In September 1968 two Russian tortoises flew to the Moon, circled it, and returned safely to Earth on the Russian Zond 5 mission.
Wiki Info
Russian TortoiseThe Russian Tortoise is a threatened species and is endemic to Central Asia.

Photo by Yuriy Danilevsky

(click photo for animal info)

Bell's Hinge-back Tortoise
Bell's Hinge-back Tortoise
Bell's hinge-back tortoise is an omnivore, with a very varied diet consisting mainly of a range of different plants, but also including insects and other meat.
Wiki Info
Bell's Hinge-back TortoiseBell's Hinge-back Tortoise is a species of African tortoise,

(click photo for animal info)

Common Snapping Turtle
Common Snapping Turtle
Common snapping turtles sometimes bask—though rarely observed—by floating on the surface with only the upper section of their shell exposed.
More Info
Common Snapping TurtleIts natural range extends from southeastern Canada, southwest to the edge of the Rocky Mountains, as far east as Nova Scotia and Florida.

(click photo for animal info)

Eastern Box Turtle
Eastern Box Turtle
Box turtles are slow crawlers, extremely long lived, slow to mature, and have relatively few offspring per year.
Wiki Info
Eastern Box TurtleThey occur in southern Maine & the southern/eastern portions of the Michigan Upper Peninsula, southern FL & eastern KS, OK, & TX.

(click photo for animal info)

Ornate Box Turtle
Ornate Box Turtle
This turtle is an omnivore, eating grasses, berries, insects and other invertebrates (caterpillars, grasshoppers, beetles, earthworms), fruits, vegetables, and carrion.
Wiki Info
Ornate Box TurtleThis species is one of only two terrestrial species of turtles native to the Great Plains of the United States.

(click photo for animal info)

Pancake Tortoise
Pancake Tortoise
The Pancake Tortoise has an unusually thin, flat, flexible shell, which is up to 7" long.
Wiki Info
Pancake TortoiseThe species is native to Tanzania and Kenya. Its common name refers to the flat shape of its shell.

Photo by Dave Pape

(click photo for animal info)

Redfoot Tortoise (baby)
Redfoot Tortoise
They are omnivorous with a diet based on an assortment of plants, fruit when available, but also including grasses, flowers, fungi, carrion, and invertebrates.
Wiki Info
Redfoot Tortoise (baby)The red-footed tortoise is a species from northern South America.

Photo by Erlend Bjørtvedt (CC-BY-SA)

(click photo for animal info)

Three-Toed Box Turtle
Three-Toed Box Turtle
Three-toed box turtles are named due to the number of toes on the back feet but some think that there are some 4-toed examples too.
More Info
Three-Toed Box TurtleThis species is native to the south-central part of the United States and is the official reptile of the state of Missouri.

(click photo for animal info)

Meet Our
Turtles/Tortoises!

Meet Our
Turtles/Tortoises!

You may choose which Turtles/Tortoises you want for your party/event on the Book a Party/Event Form.

Alligator Snapping Turtle
Alligator Snapping Turtle
The alligator snapping turtle is given its common name because of its immensely powerful jaws and distinct ridges on its shell that are similar in appearance to the rough, ridged skin of an alligator.
Wiki Info
Alligator Snapping TurtleThis turtle is found primarily in southeastern United States waters and is one of the heaviest freshwater turtles in the world.

(click photo for animal info)

Bell's Hinge-back Tortoise
Bell's Hinge-back Tortoise
Bell's hinge-back tortoise is an omnivore, with a very varied diet consisting mainly of a range of different plants, but also including insects and other meat.
Wiki Info
Bell's Hinge-back TortoiseBell's Hinge-back Tortoise is a species of African tortoise,

(click photo for animal info)

Common Musk Turtle (Stinkpot)
Common Musk Turtle (Stinkpot)
The common musk turtle is almost entirely aquatic, spending the vast majority of its time in shallow, heavily vegetated waters of slow-moving creeks or in ponds.
More Info
Common Musk Turtle (Stinkpot)This is a species of small turtle and is native to southeastern Canada and much of the Eastern United States.

(click photo for animal info)

Common Snapping Turtle
Common Snapping Turtle
Common snapping turtles sometimes bask—though rarely observed—by floating on the surface with only the upper section of their shell exposed.
More Info
Common Snapping TurtleIts natural range extends from southeastern Canada, southwest to the edge of the Rocky Mountains, as far east as Nova Scotia and Florida.

(click photo for animal info)

Desert Box Turtle
Desert Box Turtle
Lives in desert grasslands/shrublands and may face a drier, more severe environment compared with other box turtles in North America.
Wiki Info
Desert Box TurtleEndemic to the southwestern United States and northern Mexico.

(click photo for animal info)

Eastern Box Turtle
Eastern Box Turtle
Box turtles are slow crawlers, extremely long lived, slow to mature, and have relatively few offspring per year.
Wiki Info
Eastern Box TurtleThey occur in southern Maine & the southern/eastern portions of the Michigan Upper Peninsula, southern FL & eastern KS, OK, & TX.

(click photo for animal info)

Hermann's Tortoise
Hermann's Tortoise
Several tortoise sanctuaries are located in Europe, such as Carapax in southern Tuscany, and Le Village Des Tortues in the south of France (near Gonfaron).
Wiki Info
Hermann's TortoiseHermann's Tortoise can be found throughout southern Europe.

Photo by Orchi

(click photo for animal info)

Ornate Box Turtle
Ornate Box Turtle
This turtle is an omnivore, eating grasses, berries, insects and other invertebrates (caterpillars, grasshoppers, beetles, earthworms), fruits, vegetables, and carrion.
Wiki Info
Ornate Box TurtleThis species is one of only two terrestrial species of turtles native to the Great Plains of the United States.

(click photo for animal info)

Painted Wood Turtle
Painted Wood Turtle
Painted Wood Turtles can be kept as pets, and it has long been imported into the various parts of Asia, such as Japan, Taiwan and China.
Wiki Info
Painted Wood TurtleFound in Mexico (from Sonora southwards) and Central America, as far south as Costa Rica.

(click photo for animal info)

Pancake Tortoise
Pancake Tortoise
The Pancake Tortoise has an unusually thin, flat, flexible shell, which is up to 7" long.
Wiki Info
Pancake TortoiseThe species is native to Tanzania and Kenya. Its common name refers to the flat shape of its shell.

Photo by Dave Pape

(click photo for animal info)

Razor-backed Musk Turtle
Razor-backed Musk Turtle
This turtle is almost entirely aquatic, spending most of its time in shallow, heavily vegetated, slow-moving creeks, ponds, streams, and swamps.
Wiki Info
Razor-backed Musk TurtleThis species is native to the southern U.S. and is found in AL, AR, LA, MS, OK, TX and FL.

(click photo for animal info)

Redfoot Tortoise (baby)
Redfoot Tortoise
They are omnivorous with a diet based on an assortment of plants, fruit when available, but also including grasses, flowers, fungi, carrion, and invertebrates.
Wiki Info
Redfoot Tortoise (baby)The red-footed tortoise is a species from northern South America.

Photo by Erlend Bjørtvedt (CC-BY-SA)

(click photo for animal info)

Russian Tortoise
Russian Tortoise
In September 1968 two Russian tortoises flew to the Moon, circled it, and returned safely to Earth on the Russian Zond 5 mission.
Wiki Info
Russian TortoiseThe Russian Tortoise is a threatened species and is endemic to Central Asia.

Photo by Yuriy Danilevsky

(click photo for animal info)

Three-Toed Box Turtle
Three-Toed Box Turtle
Three-toed box turtles are named due to the number of toes on the back feet but some think that there are some 4-toed examples too.
More Info
Three-Toed Box TurtleThis species is native to the south-central part of the United States and is the official reptile of the state of Missouri.

(click photo for animal info)

Meet Our
Additional Fee
"Special Reptiles"!

Each "Special Reptile" is an additional $25.

You may choose which "Special Reptiles" you want for your party/event on the Book a Party/Event Form.

(These reptiles are available for an additional fee because extra measures are needed to transport them safely.)

All Austin Reptile Service lizards and snakes
are non-venomous!

Desert Tortoise
Desert Tortoise
The desert tortoise lives about 50 to 80 years; it grows slowly and generally has a low reproductive rate.
Wiki Info
Desert TortoiseNative to the Mojave & Sonoran Deserts of the southwestern U.S. and western AZ, southeastern CA, southern NV, and southwestern UT. & northwestern Mexico.

(click photo for animal info)

Savannah Monitor
Savannah Monitor
Savannah monitors are stoutly built, with relatively short limbs and toes, and skulls and teeth adapted to feed on hard-shelled prey. Maximum size is rarely more than 40 inches.
Wiki Info
Savannah MonitorA large lizard is native to Africa. It's calm and gentle.

(click photo for animal info)

Dumeril's Boa
Dumeril's Boa
A constrictor. Adults usually grow to 6.5 feet in total length (including tail) with the maximum reported to be 8 foot, 6 inches. Males usually have longer skinnier tails, while females tend to be larger overall.
Wiki Info
Dumeril's BoaNon-venomous boa species found on Madagascar.

Photo by Charles J. Sharp

(click photo for animal info)

Tegu (Argentinian Black & White)
Argentine Black & White Tegu
Tegus are sometimes kept as pets. They are notable for their unusually high intelligence and can also be house-broken.
Wiki Info
Tegu (Argentinian Black & White)An omnivorous species which inhabits the rain forests, savannas and semi-deserts of eastern & central South America.

Photo by Tom Friedel

(click photo for animal info)

Yellow-footed Tortoise
Yellow-footed Tortoise
These tortoises make a sound like a baby cooing with a raspy voice. Tortoises also identify each other using body language.
Wiki Info
Yellow-footed TortoiseThe Yellow-footed Tortoise, also known as the Brazilian giant tortoise, or more commonly, the big turtle.

Photo by Casey Klebba

(click photo for animal info)

Meet Our
Additional Fee
"Special Reptiles"!

Each "Special Reptile" is an additional $25.

You may choose which "Special Reptiles" you want for your party/event on the Book a Party/Event Form.

(These reptiles are available for an additional fee because extra measures are needed to transport them safely.)

All Austin Reptile Service lizards and snakes
are non-venomous!

Desert Tortoise
Desert Tortoise
The desert tortoise lives about 50 to 80 years; it grows slowly and generally has a low reproductive rate.
Wiki Info
Desert TortoiseNative to the Mojave & Sonoran Deserts of the southwestern U.S. and western AZ, southeastern CA, southern NV, and southwestern UT. & northwestern Mexico.

(click photo for animal info)

Savannah Monitor
Savannah Monitor
Savannah monitors are stoutly built, with relatively short limbs and toes, and skulls and teeth adapted to feed on hard-shelled prey. Maximum size is rarely more than 40 inches.
Wiki Info
Savannah MonitorA large lizard is native to Africa. It's calm and gentle.

(click photo for animal info)

Dumeril's Boa
Dumeril's Boa
A constrictor. Adults usually grow to 6.5 feet in total length (including tail) with the maximum reported to be 8 foot, 6 inches. Males usually have longer skinnier tails, while females tend to be larger overall.
Wiki Info
Dumeril's BoaNon-venomous boa species found on Madagascar.

Photo by Charles J. Sharp

(click photo for animal info)

Tegu (Argentinian Black & White)
Argentine Black & White Tegu
Tegus are sometimes kept as pets. They are notable for their unusually high intelligence and can also be house-broken.
Wiki Info
Tegu (Argentinian Black & White)An omnivorous species which inhabits the rain forests, savannas and semi-deserts of eastern & central South America.

Photo by Tom Friedel

(click photo for animal info)

Yellow-footed Tortoise
Yellow-footed Tortoise
These tortoises make a sound like a baby cooing with a raspy voice. Tortoises also identify each other using body language.
Wiki Info
Yellow-footed TortoiseThe Yellow-footed Tortoise, also known as the Brazilian giant tortoise, or more commonly, the big turtle.

Photo by Casey Klebba

(click photo for animal info)

Meet Our
Additional Fee
"Special Reptiles"!

Meet Our
Additional Fee
"Special Reptiles"!

Each "Special Reptile" is an additional $25.

You may choose which "Special Reptiles" you want for your party/event on the Book a Party/Event Form.

(These reptiles are available for an additional fee because extra measures are needed to transport them safely.)

All Austin Reptile Service lizards and snakes
are non-venomous!

Desert Tortoise
Desert Tortoise
The desert tortoise lives about 50 to 80 years; it grows slowly and generally has a low reproductive rate.
Wiki Info
Desert TortoiseNative to the Mojave & Sonoran Deserts of the southwestern U.S. and western AZ, southeastern CA, southern NV, and southwestern UT. & northwestern Mexico.

(click photo for animal info)

Dumeril's Boa
Dumeril's Boa
A constrictor. Adults usually grow to 6.5 feet in total length (including tail) with the maximum reported to be 8 foot, 6 inches. Males usually have longer skinnier tails, while females tend to be larger overall.
Wiki Info
Dumeril's BoaNon-venomous boa species found on Madagascar.

Photo by Charles J. Sharp

(click photo for animal info)

Savannah Monitor
Savannah Monitor
Savannah monitors are stoutly built, with relatively short limbs and toes, and skulls and teeth adapted to feed on hard-shelled prey. Maximum size is rarely more than 40 inches.
Wiki Info
Savannah MonitorA large lizard is native to Africa. It's calm and gentle.

(click photo for animal info)

Tegu (Argentinian Black & White)
Argentine Black & White Tegu
Tegus are sometimes kept as pets. They are notable for their unusually high intelligence and can also be house-broken.
Wiki Info
Tegu (Argentinian Black & White)An omnivorous species which inhabits the rain forests, savannas and semi-deserts of eastern & central South America.

Photo by Tom Friedel

(click photo for animal info)

Yellow-footed Tortoise
Yellow-footed Tortoise
These tortoises make a sound like a baby cooing with a raspy voice. Tortoises also identify each other using body language.
Wiki Info
Yellow-footed TortoiseThe Yellow-footed Tortoise, also known as the Brazilian giant tortoise, or more commonly, the big turtle.

Photo by Casey Klebba

(click photo for animal info)